New strategy takes whole-of-university approach to health challenges

UTS is gearing up to better address the health issues facing the 21st century. Image: Thinkstock

UTS is gearing up to better address the health issues facing the 21st century. Image: Thinkstock

In summary: 
  • UTS's new health strategy is designed to address health care system priorities and challenges
  • The strategy takes a transdisciplinary and inter-professional approach to improving health outcomes, reducing health inequalities and contributing to the redesign of health systems

Globally health is in a new and challenging era, and UTS is gearing up to better address the health issues facing the 21st century. This includes meeting the growing health care needs of an ageing population, delivering value-driven care and outcomes, and navigating the explosion in digital health technologies and big data.

“UTS has a diversity of health expertise that offers unique advantages in taking on new global health challenges and devising novel and sustainable solutions to the delivery and management of health care,” says Assistant Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) and Professor of Public Health Elizabeth Sullivan, who is leading UTS’s new health strategy.

Professor Elizabeth Sullivan at the health strategy launch. Photographer: Shane Lo Professor Elizabeth Sullivan at the health strategy launch. Photographer: Shane Lo

“We will do what we do well – we will work with industry and other partners to be a disruptor in the health and medical research ecosystem, shifting the paradigm to value-driven care and outcomes.”

Guided by a whole-of-university transdisciplinary and inter-professional approach, the strategy is designed to address health care system priorities and challenges. It aims to improve health outcomes, reduce health inequalities and contribute to the redesign of health systems.

“We will be connecting our health research and innovation, our health teaching and learning, our external engagement and providing critical thought leadership,” says Vice-Chancellor Professor Attila Brungs.

“It is only in this way we believe that the complex and multifaceted challenges facing health can be addressed.”

The university is concentrating its efforts on key health themes aligning with its strengths: primary health care and clinical services; data science and analytics; health economics and health policy; public health and prevention; health technology and digital devices; cellular biology and microbiology; health communication; regulations, ethics and law; and innovation and smart design and planning.

“Central to our strategic direction has been the way the team leading this project has ensured a comprehensive collaborative approach in bringing together all of our health strengths and capabilities to focus on where we can have the most impact,” says Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Professor Glenn Wightwick.

In introducing the strategy, Professor Brungs noted the importance of effective and accessible health care for all Australians.

“As part of our commitment to social justice at UTS, we’re determined to improve the overall health and wellbeing of our communities and create a sustainable and equitable people-centred health system for the future.”

Health at UTS – Strategic Directions 2016-21 was launched on Monday 7 November, at an event to celebrate the 25th anniversary of UTS’s Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation.

Categories:
Health and Science