Professor Michael Woods named Independent Reviewer

Professor of Health Economics Michael Woods, picture by Nathan Rodger

Professor of Health Economics Michael Woods, picture by Nathan Rodger

In summary: 
  • UTS Professor of Health Economics Michael Woods will lead a review of the accreditation system for health professionals following his appointment as Independent Reviewer by the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council
  • The review will assess the effectiveness of the accreditation system to ensure that educational programs provide "a sustainable registered health profession workforce"

Professor Michael Woods of the University of Technology Sydney has been appointed to the role of Independent Reviewer for a review of the effectiveness of the accreditation system for health professionals.

The Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council (AHMAC) announced the appointment, noting Professor Woods’ "extensive experience in economics, the public sector and health policy".

Professor Woods is a Professor of Health Economics in the highly regarded Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation (CHERE), within UTS Business School.

He has had a long career in economic policy and public finance, including 16 years as Commissioner and then Deputy Chair of the Productivity Commission, which is one of Australia's most respected research and policy advisory bodies. Earlier, he was Under-Treasurer for the ACT. 

During his time at the Productivity Commission Professor Woods presided over more than 20 national policy inquiries and studies, including a report into Australia’s health workforce.

Professor Woods will lead the Independent Review of Accreditation Systems under the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme (the Accreditation Systems Review).

The National Registration and Accreditation Scheme for the health professions (NRAS) came into operation 2010.

In 2014, the Ministerial Council commissioned an independent review of the NRAS and considered the recommendations from this review the following year.

Health Ministers accepted in principle recommendations relating to accreditation systems but asked the Ministerial Council to commission further advice.

"The Accreditation Systems Review will provide advice to AHMAC on the effectiveness of the accreditation system in order to ensure that the educational programs provide a sustainable registered health profession workforce that is flexible and responsive to the changing health needs of the Australian community," AHMAC said in a communique.

The review will be completed by the end of 2017.

Further information on the Accreditation Systems Review is available here.