UTS announces a future-focused degree for 2017: the Bachelor of Technology and Innovation

Picture by agsandrew, Getty Images

Picture by agsandrew, Getty Images

In summary: 
  • Commencing in 2017, the Bachelor of Technology and Innovation is a three-year undergraduate degree that takes a new approach to technology education
  • From the start, BTi students will collaborate with industry, community, government and academic researchers on real briefs and live projects

The University of Technology Sydney has reaffirmed its focus on producing graduates ready for the jobs of tomorrow, announcing its latest undergraduate offering: the Bachelor of Technology and Innovation (BTi).

Commencing in 2017, the Bachelor of Technology and Innovation is a three-year undergraduate degree that takes a new approach to technology education. From the start, BTi students will collaborate with industry, community, government and academic researchers on real briefs and live projects. They will engage with open, complex and networked problems and in doing so, develop the technological knowledge, skills, perspectives and strategies drawn from a diverse range of discipline areas.

Extending their industry engagement, all BTi students will have the opportunity to undertake a carefully selected internship in the second year of the program, creating a tangible connection between the university learning environment and their future career aspirations. Throughout the course they are set to explore past, present and future technology scenarios from social, technical and creative perspectives.

Professor Shirley Alexander, picture by Jesse Taylor Professor Shirley Alexander, picture by Jesse Taylor

The BTi was developed following extensive research by UTS Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education and Students) Professor Shirley Alexander and her team into jobs and skills required into the future. They also undertook extensive consultation with industry on emerging skills and knowledge shortages.

"What I've learnt from speaking to employers is that they are looking for graduates who can drive change by really exploring and understanding complex problems at a very deep level and from multiple perspectives," said Professor Alexander. "Being able to work across disciplinary boundaries and with different stakeholders means that they can engage more creatively and productively within organisations wanting to innovate."

Professor Alexander, the principal driver of UTS's award-winning learning.futures education strategy, also restated the prediction that some of the most significant jobs of today would undergo major changes or be obsolete in 10-20 years, mainly due to the increased use of automation and artificial intelligence, alongside the rise of digital and data.

"Futurists are predicting that 50 per cent of the jobs in 2030 don't exist yet and employment trends are already changing, with an increasing tendency for companies to hire freelancers rather than employing full-time permanent staff," noted Professor Alexander. "The graduates who will be successful in this future environment will be those who are fluent with technology on the one hand and have a high level of adaptability and excellent problem solving skills on the other."

With its transdisciplinary approach, this degree is equally suited to creative, ambitious students who want to do 'everything' and those students who want to go to university but are yet to find their niche.

"As Australia's number one young university, we are always looking to the future. We want to design degrees that give UTS students the best opportunities for securing, or creating, the jobs of tomorrow," said Alexander.

Prospective students can find out more about the Bachelor of Technology and Innovation by visiting the campaign site.