Researchers come for the mentoring and stay to collaborate: why UTS professor is Eureka finalist

Professor Patricia Davidson

Professor Patricia Davidson

In summary: 
  • Professor Patricia Davidson, Dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and a previous director of the UTS Centre for Cardiovascular and Chronic Care, is a Eureka Prize finalist as an Outstanding Mentor of Young Researchers.
  • She is internationally recognised for her work on chronic cardiovascular disease, heart failure, palliative care for non-malignant conditions, and women’s and Indigenous health.

Patients and families affected by chronic illnesses, particularly cardiovascular disease, have benefited from the nursing leadership shown by Professor Patricia Davidson.

So, too, has the Indigenous community of western Sydney, as well as disadvantaged women and people from culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

Young researchers have also benefited – she has been supervising and mentoring researchers since 2003, and has secured more than $15 million in competitive research funding.

Now her work as role model and mentor has earned her a place on the short list for the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, to be announced later this month.

Professor Davidson, who is Dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, US, and a previous director of the Centre for Cardiovascular and Chronic Care at UTS, has been named as one of three finalists for the prize for Outstanding Mentor of Young Researchers.

Professor Davidson came to academia after 30 years as a nurse and is now internationally recognized for her work on chronic cardiovascular disease, heart failure, palliative care for non-malignant conditions, and women’s and Indigenous health.

She has been accepted into the community of western Sydney based on her culturally respectful interactions developed over 10 years. At the same time, she has helped to develop a new generation of researchers working on Aboriginal health and wellbeing.

Her UTS colleague Professor Jane Phillips, herself the beneficiary of Professor Davidson’s PhD supervision, says high-quality researchers want to work with her, and their success can be seen in the awards, scholarships and fellowships they achieve.

“She is known for the energy, commitment and passion she devotes to enabling all of her students and staff to succeed and grow not only professionally but also personally,” says Professor Phillips.

The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) of UTS, Professor Glenn Wightwick, says the university is committed to producing world-class researchers, who deliver real benefits to industry and the broader community.

“Today's research leaders play an instrumental role in transforming our world, not only through scientific discovery, but in mentoring the next generation of research talent,” says Professor Wightwick.

“Their dedication in inspiring and developing young researchers is vital if we are to keep breaking the boundaries of innovation and entrepreneurship and make a difference with our research.”

The Australian Museum Eureka Prizes will be awarded at a dinner at Sydney Town Hall on Wednesday August 31.

 

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Health and Science